Need help accessing an Elsevier journal article?

Click here
all # a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w y z

C

The Chicago Manual of Style presents two basic documentation systems, the humanities style (notes and bibliography) and the author-date system. Choosing between the two often depends on subject matter and nature of sources cited, as each system is favored by different groups of scholars. The humanities style is preferred by many in literature, history, and the arts. This style presents bibliographic information in notes and, often, a bibliography. It accommodates a variety of sources, including esoteric ones less appropriate to the author-date system. The more concise author-date system has long been used by those in the physical, natural, and social sciences. In this system, sources are briefly cited in the text, usually in parentheses, by author’s last name and date of publication. The short citations are amplified in a list of references, where full bibliographic information is provided.

Records for all types of materials in the areas of Mexican-American topics and Latino cultures.

As part of a Chicano Movement course, students conducted video interviews with activists who participated in the civil rights struggle in the Sacramento region. By collecting the oral histories of Chicano and Chicana activists in the 1960s and ’70s, the course connects classroom learning with living history and, in the process, builds a collective archive of that fight for future generations.

“The scholarly study of children and young people is a relatively new multidisciplinary effort that spans multiple epistemologies and methodologies, making it challenging for students and scholars to stay informed. From psychology to labor rights, from ethics to education, Childhood Studies is one of the most active fields in academia today. It encompasses the meanings that adults place on children’s innocence or competence, and interrogates the notion of childhood as a social category. . . .   Researchers and practitioners at all levels need tools that help them filter through the proliferation of information sources to material that is reliable and directly relevant to their inquiries. Oxford Bibliographies in Childhood Studies will offer a trustworthy pathway through the thicket of information overload.”

 

China Data Online is the primary data source for China studies. It includes (1) China Statistical Databases; and (2) China Census Databases; It provides easy access to the various statistical yearbooks published by the National Bureau of Statistics of China, comprehensive statistics, and Census data of economy and population at national, provincial, city, county, and even township levels.

China Geo-Explorer II “fully integrates different data sources from government statistics, population census and economics census of China at different levels (province, city, county, township and ZIP code) into a spatial system with more than 6,000 comparable variables for easy access.”  Among other features, it permits the export of GIS shapefiles.

Related links: Geo-Explorer User's Guide

A full-text collection containing “an extensive range of archival material connected to the trading and cultural relationships that emerged between China, America and the Pacific region between the 18th and early 20th centuries. [It includes] Manuscript sources, rare printed texts, visual images, objects and maps”

This website offers a topical approach to the material presented in the Chinese in California digital archive.

Visit the Online Archive of California to see a guide to the full collection, including linked digital images:

https://oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt5p3019m2/

“The Chinese in California, 1850-1925 illustrates nineteenth and early twentieth century Chinese immigration to California through about 8,000 images and pages of primary source materials. Included are photographs, original art, cartoons and other illustrations; letters, excerpts from diaries, business records, and legal documents; as well as pamphlets, broadsides, speeches, sheet music, and other printed matter.”  Some of this material is available online.

The Museum’s “collection of 152 Chinese painting and calligraphy has never been studied in depth and is heretofore largely unpublished. For the first time, it is being introduced and made universally accessible through this newly developed online catalogue, which features thoughtful and provocative essays about major works by renowned scholars, with high-resolution, zoom-able images of the works of art, and thorough documentation—including transcriptions and translations of inscriptions and colophons, and seals which are transcribed, identified and located.”

Mass education materials published in Hong Kong and in Mainland China, particularly Shanghai, in the years 1947-1954. These cartoon books, pamphlets, postcards and magazines, on topics such as foreign threats to Chinese security, Chinese relations with the Soviet Union, industrial and agricultural production, and marriage reform, were produced by both Kuomintang (Nationalist) and Gongchantang (Communist) supporters. Mostly in Chinese, but SOME PAMPHLETS ARE TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH.

Tags: China, History

“Oxford Bibliographies in Chinese Studies provides an authoritative guide to the key works across the whole field, pointing researchers and practitioners at all levels to the most important scholarship in European languages as well as in Chinese (and Japanese), and giving scholars working in other fields easier access to scholarship on China.”

Follow this link to see all the Oxford Bibliographies Online to which UCDavis subscribes