Welcome to the library research guide for the field of computer science! UC Davis Library provides a wealth of  subscription and licensed resources that can help students, faculty, and researchers identify articles, proceedings, standards, and books in a print or electronic format. The following guide will point you to a selection of specialized computer science resources to help get you started with your research.

Jennifer "JJ" Harbster

Research Support Services
Librarian

jjharbster@ucdavis.edu

530-752-3208

There are numerous databases to help support your research in computer science. Depending upon your topic and purpose you might want to focus on multidisciplinary databases (e.g. Web of Science) or a more specialized database (e.g. Inspec). If you are seeking handbooks on programming languages use Safari Tech Books Online (O’Reilly Press) or search the Library Catalog. If you do not know where to start, look at a multidisciplinary database such as Web of Science or Ask a librarian for recommendations.

ACM is a major Computer Science publisher; use the ACM Digital Library to get online access to ACM publications.

A library of computer science & engineering conference proceedings and articles on the web.

Archive of technical papers about CS

Provides access to full-text IEEE transactions, journals, conference proceedings, and standards and IEE/IET journals and conferences.

Citations from scholarly journals, conference proceedings, books, reports, and dissertations in physics, electrical engineering and electronics, computers and control, and information technology.

A collection of computing books that includes the full text of O’Reilly Press books, dating from 1999 to the present.

A database for finding article citations in all fields of science and engineering, including CS.

Indexes journals, conference proceedings, trade publications, and book series in the sciences and more.

Use Library Search to find articles, ebooks, print books, and more. You can also search collections of ebooks and similar material that focus on security in the following databases:

Safari Tech Books Online (Proquest)- Security titles  – Featured collection of O’Reilly Media books related to computer/ information security.

Synthesis Lectures on Information Security, Privacy, and Trust – The Synthesis Lectures Series on Information Security, Privacy, and Trust publishes 50- to 100-page publications on topics pertaining to all aspects of the theory and practice of Information Security, Privacy, and Trust.

ACM Special Interest Group on Security, Audit and Control – ACM Special Interest Group on Security, Audit and Control’s mission is to develop the information security profession by sponsoring high quality research conferences and workshops. Provides access to ACM publications that address all aspects of information and system security, encompassing security technologies, secure systems, security applications, and security policies.

National Academies Press Computers and Information Technology – Online books that focus on Information Security and Privacy

Academic Search Complete  – The multi-disciplinary database Academic Search Complete (ASC) provides full-text access to more than 5,500 periodicals, including over 4,600 peer-reviewed journals, and indexing and abstracts for an additional 9,500 journals and 10,000 publications, including monographs, reports, conference proceedings, etc.

Business Source Complete  – “Indexing and abstracts for the most important scholarly business journals

Factiva  –  provides access to global news and business information, including local newspapers, same-day newswires, company reports, and media programs. Provides company information including market data and competitors. Includes full-text of the Wall Street Journal.

Gartner Campus Access  – Gartner provides technology-related information and insights, containing research findings and advice on technology markets, topics, and industries that help inform decisions related to information technology. Among the type of research that can be found in Gartner are:

* Technology products, services, and trends
* Global IT industry perspectives
* IT management and organizations
* IT strategies and governance
* Business-IT issues
* Market research
* Real-world case studies

LexisNexis Academic – One of the largest web-based full-text databases for current news, business and legal information, supporting a broad range of interdisciplinary research, LexisNexis Academic provides full-text access to nearly 6,000 individual titles. Includes a wide range of U.S. and foreign newspapers, plus transcripts of television and radio news programs. Business resources include business articles, accounting literature, company financial information. Legal resources include state and federal laws and regulations, a full range of case law, and law review articles.

 

There are several online libraries of compter science related books that we subscribe to, including:

The following sources will help you find books (online and print) available at UCD and beyond using standard library resources:

Library Catalog  (formerly Harvest Catalog)

The Library Catalog tells you what the UC Davis library owns, what the call number is, where it is located, and whether or not it is checked out.  If there is an electronic version that we subscribe to, the link will be in the catalog.
Use the catalog to locate books, journals, government documents, dissertations, maps, music scores & recordings, movies, and any other materials the library owns.

MELVYL UC  Library Catalog                  Melvyl Help

The MELVYL catalog tells you what all UC campus libraries own, and also searches other institutions.  As with the UCD Library Catalog, MELVYL gives records for books, journals, government documents, dissertations, maps, music scores & recordings, movies, and other materials.
MELVYL does index some articles but is not a good option for searching for articles in the sciences.

The REQUEST button:   allows you to request items from other institutions (UC and non-UC).

GOOGLE Books                                Google Books Help

Library catalogs only search catalog entries (author, title, subject indexing, etc) not the full text of the book
Google Books searches full-text of books (only titles that Google has scanned), but you cannot access most of them (because they are still under copyright)

But you can use Google Books to identify titles you might be interested in.
–Use Google Books to search for phrases or topics you are intereted in (works well for technical terms).
–Then search for the title of the book(s) in the UCD Library Catalog or Melvyl

WorldCat Catalog

OCLC catalog: millions of records for books, journal titles and materials in other formats from approximately 12,000 libraries worldwide.  Coverage: 1000 A.D. to the present.


Individual UCD  dissertations and masters theses are cataloged in the Library of Catalog — search for “Dissertations Academic University of California Davis physics”

This page describes how to locate and access UCD titles.

The Dissertation Abstracts International (DAI) database is the authoritative source for finding doctoral dissertations and master’s theses. It also provides access to the full-text of all dissertations from University of California campuses since the late 1990s- See
Current Research @ University of California, Davis
Searches all University of California, Davis dissertations published in the Dissertation Abstracts database.

Dissertations & theses from 31 USA colleges & universities, including Ohio State University, Rochester Institute of Technology, and North Carolina State University. This is a small subset of published dissertations & theses, but does include some that are not indexed elsewhere. Use in conjunction with other databases such as Dissertations & Theses and PQDT Open.

OATD.org aims to be the best possible resource for finding open access graduate theses and dissertations published around the world.

PQDT Open provides the full text of open access dissertations and theses free of charge.

You can Ask a librarian for help if you experience any problems accessing a dissertation or thesis in print or online.

Doing a cited reference search in science and engineering

Doing a cited reference search answers the question: who has cited a particular author or paper? Knowing this can help you find related papers to the one you have, and help determine how well-known a particular author or paper is in a field.

Also see the Guide:  Cited Reference Searching: Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

The main database that offers cited reference search is Web of Science:

Web of Science(WOS)

“Web of Science” was the first database to offer cited reference searching. You can use it to look up an author or a specific work and find out how many articles in the database have this author or work in their footnotes/reference.

Note: Our subscription to Web of Science includes Book Citation Index to the footnotes of books or essays published in books after 2005. Also keep in mind, Web of Science  does not index every journal in every field, only a selection of what it regards as core titles.

See this short video (~3 mins) to learn more about WoS cited reference searches

Instructions:

This short video (~5 mins) gives an overview and tips on how to do author and cited work searches

  1. On the home page of Web of Science, select Cited Reference Search
  2. Enter a name in the Cited Author field- this can be tricky. Start by the author’s name (last name [space, no comma] first initial *). Add the cited work and/or year the item you are interested in was published.
  3. Click “search.” You then see a list titled “Cited Reference Index.” Each line refers to a work that matches your search criteria. The same work may be referenced in several lines because of slight differences in the data (different cited pages for example.) The number at the start of each line is the number of times that reference has been cited in other works.
  4. Check the boxes in front of all relevant lines and click “Finish Search.” This generates a list of articles that cite one or more of the items you selected.

 

Will you be starting a project from scratch that will require your attention for months, even years OR are you continuing a project started by somebody else?

The Data Management Program is here to help make both of these situations less painful. We can help you with

  • Organization: keep track of your files so that you know what is in them
  • Consistent data entry: design data collection forms in such a way that everybody doing the same experiment records the results the same way every time
  • Database structure: move from unwieldy spreadsheets to databases
  • GIS and maps: consult with our GIS expert on all stages of a project that includes geospatial data, from planning to creating interactive maps.
  • Finding data: not all data sharing portals are obvious, and we can help with that.
  • Cleaning data: stop doing repetitive copy/paste; check out some of our workshops to find a better way
  • Getting credit for data: get your dataset noticed and cited by placing it in the right data repository
  • Note: many funding agencies require that you provide open access to your data!

For more information, visit our website or contact us at dataserv@ucdavis.edu