NUT 291 Nutritional Biology Graduate Seminar

by Ruth Gustafson – May 20, 2022

This guide lists resources which are useful for locating literature across a range of nutritional biology topics.  To access licensed library resources from off-campus, please use the library VPN.

Ruth and Megan are happy to help if you have questions or need additional assistance.

FOR UCD students, faculty, and staff:  During this COVID-19 time, feel free to book a Zoom appointment for assistance in using these resources or for any questions you may have:

Book an APPOINTMENT with Ruth

Ruth Gustafson

Student Services
Student Services and Researcher Services Librarian

ragustafson@ucdavis.edu

530-752-1883

In this Guide:

Note that the UCD Library has many publications on nutritional biology. Here are some key Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH)  to paste into the catalog under the Subject field search:  Nutrition — Research ;  etc.

The UCD Libraries selectively buy materials on writing in the biological/medical sciences. Browsable subject headings that bring up these types of publications include:

Biology — Authorship ; Communication of technical information ; Life sciences — Authorship ; Medical writing ; Proposal writing in biology ; Proposal writing for grants ; Proposal writing for medicine ; Proposal writing for research ; Report writing ; Scientific illustration ; Technical writing ; Visual communication in science 

  • UC Library Search: UCD Library Catalog setting
    Replacing UCD Library Catalog on July 27, 2021, the new UC Library Search includes all of the UC library collections.   This setting is specifically for the UC Davis libraries including (for the first time) the holdings of the Law Library. If you Sign in (on top right corner) using your UCD login and Kerberos passphrase, you are prompted with your loan period, can renew books online, and request items that have been checked out to another borrower, or are in storage.

NEED a PRINT ONLY ITEM AND CANNOT COME TO CAMPUS?  We’ll ship it to you!  The UCD Libraries have a COVID-time-only shipping service in place.   Just click on the INTERLIBRARY REQUEST link from the item you need and we’ll mail the whole item to you.  Make sure you have your correct address listed, when prompted.

ONLY NEED a chapter or an article from a PRINT ONLY ITEM?  Scanning service available for all UCD affiliates.  Use the same INTERLIBRARY REQUEST link but make a note of the specific chapter/article you need and include as much info as you can, especially page number, if available.

Due dates will become active with start of Fall Quarter.  “If you are in the [UCD] area and would like to return materials, you can deposit returns via the remote book drops or at Shields or Blaisdell Medical Library. Materials may also be mailed back at no cost to you. Contact shieldsinterloan@ucdavis.edu for additional instructions and to receive a postage-paid mailing label.”

 

OCLC catalog of millions of records for books, journal titles and materials in other formats from approximately 12,000 libraries worldwide.

Coverage: 1000 A.D.-present

There is a subject guide matching nearly every department at the UC Davis campus.  Find the Subject Guide which best matches your major!  This browsable list is organized by broad disciplinary categories:  Agricultural and Environmental SciencesArts & HumanitiesBiological SciencesEngineering & TransportationGeneral & Multidisciplinary SourcesGovernment InformationHealth SciencesPhysical Sciences, and Social Sciences.

Note the following cross-disciplinary but useful guides for Nutritional Biology researchers:

Patents  ,  Technical Reports ,  and Standards & Specifications

BrowZine

BrowZine Journal engagement platform is a browsable newsstand for top UC Davis journals, i.e., Advances in Materials Science, and Computational Materials Science, etc. 

Journal Citation Reports (JCR)

Clarivate Analytics Journal Citation Reports (JCR)  is a comprehensive tool for assessing the importance of research journals in disciplines and subdisciplines including medical specialties.

NOTE that *review* journals tend to be listed as top ranked titles, taking space away from original research titles, so use with caution. Typical review series may have the following words in their title: Advances in … ; Annual Review of …; Critical Reviews in … ; Current Opinion in … ; Expert Reviews in … ; International Review of … ; Progress in … ; Trends in …

Journal Citation Reports (JCR) is an annual publication by Thomson Reuters with each yearly data analysis being completed in the summer of the following year. JCR indicates: most frequently cited journals in a field: highest impact journals in a field; and largest journals in a field. JCR Science Edition contains data from over 7,300 journals in science and technology. JCR Social Sciences Edition contains data from over 2,200 journals in the social sciences. NOTE: For disciplines that have longer timespans for citation, consider sorting for ranking by using the 5-year Impact Factor sort.
Release Coverage: 1997-2019 (for 1996-2018 data)
Impact Factors in Wikipedia: validity, manipulation, and misuse of Impact Factors
Using JCR Wisely

The UCD Library maintains a webpage on Citation Guides, which focuses mainly on EndNote.

Some additional webpages are:

The Library provides services, resources, and assistance to those working with data across the research life-cycle.

Read below to see how we can assist with:

Research Data Services

Also note that the DataLab provides workshops and a variety of resources for Data Science and Informatics related research.

DataLab: Data Science and Informatics

 

(Content below authored by Cory Craig)

Elsevier- Available content-

  • Most Elsevier articles published in 2018 or earlier: You will still be able to access the full text of many articles via ScienceDirect because UC’s prior contracts included permanent access to previously published content in most Elsevier journals.
  • Open access articles: The article you’re seeking may be available with open access from the journal’s website or elsewhere online (click here for tips on how to search for open access versions).
  • Elsevier e-books and other products licensed by the UC (e.g., Compendex, Reaxys, INSPEC) or by UC Davis (e.g., Scopus, Embase, ClinicalKey for Nursing/Clinical Skills) are covered under separate contracts and remain available as before.

WHAT IS AFFECTED

Elsevier has discontinued UC’s direct access to:

  • Articles with a 2019, 2020 or 2021 publish date
  • Backfiles of certain journals for which the UC’s prior contract did not include permanent access.

See below for other ways to access the articles you need.

NOTE that the University of California Library System is currently in negotiation again with Elsevier (February 2021)

 

OTHER WAYS TO ACCESS RESOURCES

Preserves and provides lawful access to the 17+ million digitized items.
  • During COVID time, special online access is provided to many older print-only UCD resources via the Hathitrust ETAS (Emergency Temporary Access System).   Links are available in the UCD Library catalog, when a matching online record is available in Hathitrust ETAS.

 

PLUGINS AND SEARCH TOOLS

Unpaywall: Install the browser plugin and a green tab with a padlock icon will appear in your browser with a direct link to the full-text article if a free version is available. Watch our one-minute video to learn how.

 

 

Google ScholarFind open versions of articles via Google Scholar or, to make searching more convenient, add the Google Scholar Button to your browser; then select the title of a paper, from any webpage, and click the Scholar button to find it.

 


Open Access Button:
 Use their website or browser plugin to get free, legal research articles and data delivered immediately or automatically requested from the author. Watch our one-minute video to learn how.

 

KopernioInstall this browser plugin to download free, full-text PDFs when available. Watch our one-minute video to learn how.

 

 

PubMed CentralSearch this free archive of over 5 million full-text biomedical and life science journal articles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author ID/Profile (Content below authored by Cory Craig)

ORCID IDORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) is an independent, non-profit, community-driven organization that provides unique, persistent identifiers (ORCID iDs) for researchers in all fields.

ORCID iDs:

  • resolve name ambiguity
  • integrate your work in the digital scholarly ecosystem
  • will soon make it possible to create an automatically updated list of your publications (if:  you include your ORCID iD when submitting manuscripts; enable the Auto-Update feature; publishers allow/require ORCID iDs as part of manuscript submission, as increasing numbers are doing).  

Go to  ORCID  and click “register now” to obtain an ORCID iD.

Recommended:

  • Use the search & link wizards to add your works (publications and other scholarship)
  • Use the search & link wizards to list funding you have received

All aspects of your ORCID record are entirely under your control.

WHAT IT’S USED FOR // HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR PROFILE AND CORRECT ERRORS

  • Include your ORCID iD when submitting manuscripts (where possible/required)
  • Link other IDs you have to your ORCID iD (Web of Science Reseacher ID, Scopus Author ID, Loop profile, etc.).
  • Consider unifying the “beyond the PDF” aspects of your scholarship (Google Scholar Profile, Twitter account, blog, FigShare, GitHub, ImpactStory, etc.) by listing them in the “Websites” section of your ORCID iD.
  • Include your ORCID iD on your: departmental web page/profile,  C.V.,  email signature, twitter profile, grants, and anywhere else you provide a list of your work.

Google Scholar Profile:   What is it?

If you have publications indexed in Google Scholar, you can create a profile that will show up when people search on your name. It will display your publications, any information you provide, and a set of metrics including h-index.

HOW TO GET ONE:

Go to  Google Scholar Citations  and sign in with your Google account. You will then be asked for your name, affiliation, etc. Next, Google Scholar will automatically suggest publications to add to your profile. Select the ones that are yours to add to your profile. Add your research interests as keywords, which can then be used to search on by people looking for other researchers in a field.

WHAT IT’S USED FOR:

A Google Scholar profile will show up at the top of results when people search for your publications in Google Scholar. It increases visibility of your work by providing a bibliography, indicates which publications are yours if you share a common name. It also shows a citation count to your work, provides an H-index measure.

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR PROFILE AND CORRECT ERRORS

See Google’s FAQ for answers to how to add missing publications or correct other errors.

TO FIND GOOGLE SCHOLAR PROFILES FOR OTHER UC DAVIS RESEACHERS:

Search Google  for: “Verified email at ucdavis.edu” chemistry -label    [replace “chemistry” with subject/topic of interest]
Or click:     Verified email at ucdavis.edu” chemistry -label


Altmetrics:  What is it?

Altmetrics: is a term coined in 2010 to refer to metrics that offer alternative (or additional options) to widely accepted metrics such as journal impact factor, number of citations to a given article, h-index, etc. Altmetrics provides a social media profile for an article, including: blogs, tweets,  Facebook, Google+, CiteULike, Wikipedia, Mendeley, Connotea,  Reddit, and news outlets that have referenced the article.  Includes links to postings and metrics.

Altmetrics Bookmarklet:   is available free.
Go to:  Altmetrics Bookmarklet
Grab and drag the ALTMETRICS Bookmarklet to your toolbar.

Altmetrics sells access to three products:   Explorer, Embeddable badges, Altmetric API.

WHAT IT’S USED FOR:

Add the Altmetrics Bookmarklet to your tool bar, visit any paper available online, click the bookmarklet to get article level metrics for that paper.  Track the impact of your articles, or articles of interest to you, in social media.


ResearcherID:   What is it?

Researcher ID  is a unique identifier scheme developed by Thompson Reuters and used in Web of Science as well as being compatible with other ID schemes.

 

HOW TO GET ONE:

Go to  ResearcherID  and click “join now”, and enter your information. You will be sent an email; click on the link in the email and finish entering your information (such as your

institution name) to create the ResearcherID. You will then be able to link the ID to ORCID.

WHAT IT’S USED FOR:

ResearcherID, like ORCID and SCOPUS author ID, is used to tell authors with similar names apart and produce profiles of author work. If you use Endnote or Web of Science, ResearcherID ties into these systems seamlessly. Use your ResearcherID on your CV, grants, and other profiles.

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR PROFILE AND CORRECT ERRORS

Once you have gotten the ResearcherID, you can add to your publications list by clicking “add publications” and then searching Web of Science, adding a RIS file from Endnote or RefManager, or connecting directly to Endnote. You can also connect to ORCID, and import the publications from your ORCID profile (or vice-versa).


Scopus Author ID:   What is it?

SCOPUS  is a database of literature from all fields, produced by Elsevier. The database automatically assigns unique ID numbers to authors. These IDs help SCOPUS distinguish between similarly-named authors as well as helping to group all the documents by an author together.

HOW TO GET ONE:

If you have publications indexed by SCOPUS, you have automatically been assigned a SCOPUS author ID number. You can check this by going to SCOPUS  and entering your information.

WHAT IT’S USED FOR:

In addition to being the tool SCOPUS uses to identify authors, some grant agencies will ask you for SCOPUS ID numbers.
How to improve your profile and correct errors.

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR PROFILE AND CORRECT ERRORS

If there are errors in your profile, you can fill out the author feedback form: in SCOPUS, run an author search, click on the author’s name, then on the link that says “request author detail corrections.”
You can add your SCOPUS ID to your ORCID profile by clicking “add to ORCID” from your author page in SCOPUS; directions are here.  Once you do this, you will be asked to log into ORCID, to verify that you authorize SCOPUS to access your ORCID account, and then you will walk through adding the appropriate SCOPUS profile and publications to your ORCID profile.