by Ruth Gustafson — October 7, 2021
by Ruth Gustafson — October 7, 2021

Your Scholarly Profile & Professional Identity

by Ruth Gustafson – October 7, 2021

Researchers and scholars have important areas they need to consider for maintaining their scholarly profile and managing their professional identity.

 

 

 

CREDIT:  Original content created by Cory Craig, Former Physical Sciences & Engineering Librarian

Ruth Gustafson

Student Services
Student Services and Researcher Services Librarian

ragustafson@ucdavis.edu

530-752-1883

In this Guide:

Author ID/Profile

ORCID IDORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) is an independent, non-profit, community-driven organization that provides unique, persistent identifiers (ORCID iDs) for researchers in all fields.

ORCID iDs:

  • resolve name ambiguity
  • integrate your work in the digital scholarly ecosystem
  • will soon make it possible to create an automatically updated list of your publications (if:  you include your ORCID iD when submitting manuscripts; enable the Auto-Update feature; publishers allow/require ORCID iDs as part of manuscript submission, as increasing numbers are doing).  

Go to  ORCID  and click “register now” to obtain an ORCID iD.

Recommended:

  • Use the search & link wizards to add your works (publications and other scholarship)
  • Use the search & link wizards to list funding you have received

All aspects of your ORCID record are entirely under your control.

WHAT IT’S USED FOR // HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR PROFILE AND CORRECT ERRORS

  • Include your ORCID iD when submitting manuscripts (where possible/required)
  • Link other IDs you have to your ORCID iD (Web of Science Reseacher ID, Scopus Author ID, Loop profile, etc.).
  • Consider unifying the “beyond the PDF” aspects of your scholarship (Google Scholar Profile, Twitter account, blog, FigShare, GitHub, ImpactStory, etc.) by listing them in the “Websites” section of your ORCID iD.
  • Include your ORCID iD on your: departmental web page/profile,  C.V.,  email signature, twitter profile, grants, and anywhere else you provide a list of your work.

Google Scholar Profile:   What is it?

If you have publications indexed in Google Scholar, you can create a profile that will show up when people search on your name. It will display your publications, any information you provide, and a set of metrics including h-index.

HOW TO GET ONE:

Go to  Google Scholar Citations  and sign in with your Google account. You will then be asked for your name, affiliation, etc. Next, Google Scholar will automatically suggest publications to add to your profile. Select the ones that are yours to add to your profile. Add your research interests as keywords, which can then be used to search on by people looking for other researchers in a field.

WHAT IT’S USED FOR:

A Google Scholar profile will show up at the top of results when people search for your publications in Google Scholar. It increases visibility of your work by providing a bibliography, indicates which publications are yours if you share a common name. It also shows a citation count to your work, provides an H-index measure.

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR PROFILE AND CORRECT ERRORS

See Google’s FAQ for answers to how to add missing publications or correct other errors.

TO FIND GOOGLE SCHOLAR PROFILES FOR OTHER UC DAVIS RESEACHERS:

Search Google  for: “Verified email at ucdavis.edu” chemistry -label    [replace “chemistry” with subject/topic of interest]
Or click:     Verified email at ucdavis.edu” chemistry -label


Altmetrics:  What is it?

Altmetrics: is a term coined in 2010 to refer to metrics that offer alternative (or additional options) to widely accepted metrics such as journal impact factor, number of citations to a given article, h-index, etc. Altmetrics provides a social media profile for an article, including: blogs, tweets,  Facebook, Google+, CiteULike, Wikipedia, Mendeley, Connotea,  Reddit, and news outlets that have referenced the article.  Includes links to postings and metrics.

Altmetrics Bookmarklet:   is available free.
Go to:  Altmetrics Bookmarklet
Grab and drag the ALTMETRICS Bookmarklet to your toolbar.

Altmetrics sells access to three products:   Explorer, Embeddable badges, Altmetric API.

WHAT IT’S USED FOR:

Add the Altmetrics Bookmarklet to your tool bar, visit any paper available online, click the bookmarklet to get article level metrics for that paper.  Track the impact of your articles, or articles of interest to you, in social media.


ResearcherID:   What is it?

Researcher ID  is a unique identifier scheme developed by Thompson Reuters and used in Web of Science as well as being compatible with other ID schemes.

 

HOW TO GET ONE:

Go to  ResearcherID  and click “join now”, and enter your information. You will be sent an email; click on the link in the email and finish entering your information (such as your

institution name) to create the ResearcherID. You will then be able to link the ID to ORCID.

WHAT IT’S USED FOR:

ResearcherID, like ORCID and SCOPUS author ID, is used to tell authors with similar names apart and produce profiles of author work. If you use Endnote or Web of Science, ResearcherID ties into these systems seamlessly. Use your ResearcherID on your CV, grants, and other profiles.

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR PROFILE AND CORRECT ERRORS

Once you have gotten the ResearcherID, you can add to your publications list by clicking “add publications” and then searching Web of Science, adding a RIS file from Endnote or RefManager, or connecting directly to Endnote. You can also connect to ORCID, and import the publications from your ORCID profile (or vice-versa).


Scopus Author ID:   What is it?

SCOPUS  is a database of literature from all fields, produced by Elsevier. The database automatically assigns unique ID numbers to authors. These IDs help SCOPUS distinguish between similarly-named authors as well as helping to group all the documents by an author together.

HOW TO GET ONE:

If you have publications indexed by SCOPUS, you have automatically been assigned a SCOPUS author ID number. You can check this by going to SCOPUS  and entering your information.

WHAT IT’S USED FOR:

In addition to being the tool SCOPUS uses to identify authors, some grant agencies will ask you for SCOPUS ID numbers.
How to improve your profile and correct errors.

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR PROFILE AND CORRECT ERRORS

If there are errors in your profile, you can fill out the author feedback form: in SCOPUS, run an author search, click on the author’s name, then on the link that says “request author detail corrections.”
You can add your SCOPUS ID to your ORCID profile by clicking “add to ORCID” from your author page in SCOPUS; directions are here.  Once you do this, you will be asked to log into ORCID, to verify that you authorize SCOPUS to access your ORCID account, and then you will walk through adding the appropriate SCOPUS profile and publications to your ORCID profile.

Guides/resources created for library classes taught for the Biological & Agricultural Engineering department are listed here

Grad Seminar: ORCID  Slides
Fall 2019