Mexico

The Digital National Security Archive contains the most comprehensive set of declassified government documents available. The resource now includes 44 collections consisting of over 104,000 meticulously indexed documents, with more than 733,000 total pages. Each of these collections, compiled by top scholars and experts, exhaustively covers the most critical world events, countries, and U.S. policy decisions from post World War II through the 21st century. Together, these collections offer unparalleled access to the defining international strategies of our time. Glossaries, chronologies, bibliographies, overviews, and photographs are included.

This collection of popular movie periodicals, archived in the Filmoteca of UNAM in Mexico City, includes Cinema Reporter (1943-1965), Cine Mundial (1954-1955), El Cine Gráfico (1935), the weekly El Mundo Ilustrado (1902-1910), and Cinelandia (1931-1947). Ephemeral materials such as film flyers and scrap books of Fernando de Fuentes (1894-1958), a leading Latin-American filmmaker, supplement the full-text periodical articles.

Coverage: 1902-1960's
Tags: Film, Mexico

Guide to databases, full-text resources and print works related to the U.S. – Mexico borderlands region.

Started in 1942, the Bracero Program brought millions of Mexican guest workers to the United States, and over the next two decades, more than 4 million Mexicans came to work in the country. This public history resource from the Center for History and New Media at Georgetown University brings together oral histories and artifacts pertaining to the program. Visitors can read the “About” section to learn more about the program and its legacy and then move on to browse the documents. The document archive can be searched in its entirety, or users can also move through areas that include “Images”, “Documents”, and “Oral Histories”. Educators will want to look over the “Teaching” area, as it features three different learning activities which draw on the archive’s documents. Also, the “Resources” area includes a video tutorial on how to use the archive effectively and several interview questions for those who might know some former Bracero workers.